c           Welcome to the original
Sheffield Indexers

| Home | Back to Lest We Forget | Links |

The Menin Gate, Ypres

October 1914 - 1918 British and Commonwealth troops marched through the Meenenpoorte or Menin Gate from the city of Ypres (Map) onto The Menin Road and into the battlefields of the Ypres Salient.

In 1936, two large stone guardian lions were donated to the Australian War Memorial (see also Virtual Tour) by the burgomaster of the Belgian city of Ypres. The lions, carved from limestone, were given to the Australian government as a gesture of friendship. The lions had originally stood on plinths on either side of the Menin Gate at Ypres. This gate was one of only two entries into the medieval fortified city.

After the war, the Menin Gate was chosen as the site for a memorial to the thousands of allied soldiers who were killed and buried somewhere in the Ypres Salient with no known grave.  The memorial consists of an imposing archway surmounted by a recumbent lion and it is inscribed with the names of 54,900 dead from Britain and Commonwealth countries.

The remains of over 90,000 troops have never been found or identified. The gate was considered to be a fitting location to place a memorial to the missing British and Commonwealth soldiers.  It was opened in 1927.

[Sources: www.greatwar.co.uk, www.awm.gov.au, www.answers.com, www.firstworldwar.com]

Click to Enlarge
Click to Enlarge
 
Click to Enlarge
Click to Enlarge
 
Click to Enlarge
Click to Enlarge
 
Click to Enlarge
Click to Enlarge
 
Click to Enlarge
Click to Enlarge
 
Click to Enlarge
Click to Enlarge
 

Click to Enlarge

 


copyright Sheffield Indexers since 2004. All rights reserved.
| Terms of Use | Disclaimer | Contacts | Home | Site Map |